Are your passwords safe and un-crackable?

Do you know that on average every person has to manage and remember up to 90 accounts and passwords?

From personal emails to work emails, from online shopping accounts to online account software, everyday we are logging in and out of various accounts.

How are you protecting your business from someone trying to steal your password or hacking into your accounts?

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Giving the most with your Bushfire Donation

It’s amazing, and emotionally uplifting, to see how generous Australians are when it comes to making donations to help with the bushfire crisis.   It is also a good time to be aware that, for your donation to be tax deductible, it must be made to an organisation that has been given official status by the ATO as a Deductible Gift Recipient (DGR).  If you are on a high marginal tax rate and know that the donation will give you a year-end tax deduction, that may encourage you to give more.

Most of the major charities are DGRs but sometimes, in times of crisis like this, small groups of people set up local fundraising entities and these might not have registered to be DGRs.  Similarly, many of the donation-seeking funds set up online through websites such as GoFundMe will not necessarily be registered as DGRs.

Some people may not be too concerned about this, and may still choose to support the fundraiser that best suits their ethos, no matter whether it gives them a tax deduction.   Others may be willing to give more if they know they will get a reduction in their year-end tax.

So, How do you check if an organisation is a DGR?

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Think twice before writing 20 instead of 2020

Year 2020 has arrived, and we are nearly a week in. People are starting to get back to work – so are scammers.

When dating documents, we love using abbreviations.

Last year we used to write 19 instead of 2019.

So it’s normal for us to write 20 to indicate 2020, but this poses a fraud risk.

A date like 6 Jan 20 can easily be defrauded as 6 Jan 2019 by adding 2 more digits behind the year.

The consequence can be huge: imagine if this is written on a formal contract and the date has been fraudulently backdated, where you are liable for any monies owing since the date of contract. Or if someone post-dates a cheque that has turned stale.

So save yourself some hassles down the track by writing the full 2020 when dating documents.

Mythbusting the tax accountant’s industry

The busy season is here, and we are meeting our clients everyday to help with preparing their tax returns, business and tax advisory and bookkeeping queries. Very often during our conversations they raise some interesting questions, let’s have a look at some of them here.

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Carry Forward Concessional Contributions – are you eligible?

2019/20 is the first financial year that you can take advantage of the new carried forward concessional contributions measure that commenced on the 1 July 2018.

To be eligible, your total super balance must be less than $500,000 at 30 June 2019.  If it is, then you may be able to make additional concessional contributions in the 2019/20 financial year.

What does this mean?

Essentially any unused contribution cap from the 2018/19 year can be carried forward to the current year.  As an example if a member only made a concessional contribution of $10,000 in the 2019 year, they can bring forward the remaining amount of the cap $15,000 ($25,000-$10,000) and add it to their 2019/20 cap.  This would mean that the concessional contribution cap for the 2019/20 increases to $40,000 ($25,000+$$15,000) for that member.

This option would be something to consider if you’re expecting a higher taxable income in the 2019/20 year as personal concessional contributions are tax deductible.  Going forward it would be possible to carry forward unused cap limits for 5 years (starting with the 2018/19 year).

Below is a table the ATO have provided to illustrate how the unused cap works:

Table 2: Unused concessional cap carry forward

Description 2017–18 2018–19 2019–20 2020–21 2021–22
General contributions cap $25,000 $25,000 $25,000 $25,000 $25,000
Total unused available cap accrued Not applicable $0 $22,000 $44,000 $69,000
Maximum cap available $25,000 $25,000 $47,000 $25,000 $94,000
Superannuation balance 30 June prior year Not applicable $480,000 $490,000 $505,000 $490,000
Concessional contributions nil $3,000 $3,000 nil nil
Unused concessional cap amount accrued in the relevant financial year $0 $22,000 $22,000 $25,000 $25,000

 

It can get confusing which is why you should seek professional advice before making contributions in excess of the annual cap.  Getting it wrong can cause excess concessional contribution issues.

If you would like more information on carried forward concessional contributions caps, please contact us.

Aston Accountants can provide you with SMSF Advice with regards to making contributions to super.  If you would like us to assess your personal situation and whether you can utilise the carry forward concessional contributions, please speak to us.